Cover image for The boy who reversed himself
Title:
The boy who reversed himself
ISBN:
9780525442769

9780140389654
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Puffin Books, 1998, c1986.
Physical Description:
167 p. ; 19 cm.
Summary:
When Laura discovers that the unpopular boy living next door to her has the ability to go into the fourth dimension, she makes the dangerous decision to accompany him on his journeys there.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.7 7.0 558.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.1 12 Quiz: 01512 Guided reading level: Y.
Interest grade level:
5-8.
Audience:
710 Lexile.
Reading level:
6.5 Dale-Chall.
Holds:

Available:*

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Teen Paperback Fiction Sleat
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Summary

Summary

When Laura discovers that the unpopular boy living next door to her has the ability to go into the fourth dimension, she makes the dangerous decision to accompany him on his journeys there.


Summary

When Laura finds her homework in her locker with its writing reversed, she's baffled, until she learns an unbelievable secret: her weird neighbor, Omar, has the ability to travel to the fourth dimension. Laura forces him to take her there'and then, a novice in ?four-space,? she goes there on her own. There's only one problem'she doesn't know how to get back.'A cerebral science-fiction thriller, cunningly constructed to keep the reader involved until the last pages.' ? The Horn Book


Author Notes

William Sleator was born on February 13, 1945 in Harve de Grace, Maryland. In 1967, he received a BA in English from Harvard University. He mainly wrote science fiction novels for young adults. His first novel, Blackbriar, was published in 1972. He wrote more than 30 books including House of Stairs, Interstellar Pig, The Green Futures of Tycho, Strange Attractors, The Spirit House, The Boy Who Couldn't Die, and The Phantom Limb. His picture book, The Angry Moon, won a Caldecott Award in 1971. He died on August 3, 2011 at the age of 66.

(Bowker Author Biography)


William Sleator was born on February 13, 1945 in Harve de Grace, Maryland. In 1967, he received a BA in English from Harvard University. He mainly wrote science fiction novels for young adults. His first novel, Blackbriar, was published in 1972. He wrote more than 30 books including House of Stairs, Interstellar Pig, The Green Futures of Tycho, Strange Attractors, The Spirit House, The Boy Who Couldn't Die, and The Phantom Limb. His picture book, The Angry Moon, won a Caldecott Award in 1971. He died on August 3, 2011 at the age of 66.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up How can the mathematical uncertainties and complexities of the fourth dimension translate into a successful novel? Sleator begins by creating fully realized, sympathetic, three -dimensional characters whom readers are eager to follow into an alternative ``terra'' so ``incognita'' as to boggle the mind and inspire an almost Lovecraftian horror. Omar, a ``weird'' new kid, and teenage Laura are the travelers into the fourth dimension here, and those adults who may question their motivation have forgotten the overwhelming urgency of the adolescent need for love and acceptance. The alternative world that they find is a spectacularly successful speculative achievement, thanks in part to its remarkable verisimilitude and in part to Sleator's success in creating wonderfully alien creatures who are, nevertheless, emotionally and intellectually comprehensible. The mathematics of their milieu has also been made intellectually comprehensible (no small achievement) by Sleator's skillful introduction of theoretical considerations into his plot and his consistent application of them. In fact his two worldsours and its fourth-dimensional neighbormay be seen as representing two sides of an equation, just as his two sets of charactersLaura and Omar, Gigigi and Ramoomare oddly identical. The sum of all these disparate parts is a novel that is viscerally exciting, mentally stimulating, and deeply satisfying. Michael Cart, Beverly Hills Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Once again, Sleator treats us to the best that YA science fiction can offer: averageand sometimes not-so-averageteenagers facing the physical and mathematical absurdities of our universe. Laura's determination to get into medical school has cast her as a brain and, thus, untouchable. She has a crush on Pete, the football captainand weird things are happening on a daily basis, ever since Omar, the creepy boy next door, moved in. Laura makes Omar confess his secrets: he's training to become the guardian of the Second Dimension, while he's exploring the Fifth. Laura invites Pete on a journey to the Fifth Dimensionbut her game becomes a nightmare when she and Pete are captured, and the whole existence of the world depends on Omar's ability to rescue them. After the seriousness of Singularity, Sleator has returned to some of the humor of Interstellar Pig. A welcome offering from a versatile writer. (10-16) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Teenage Laura wheedles her weirdo neighbor, Omar, into taking her into the fourth dimension, a seemingly nightmare world in which she views everything inside and out, in cross section and in parts. (O 15 86)


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up How can the mathematical uncertainties and complexities of the fourth dimension translate into a successful novel? Sleator begins by creating fully realized, sympathetic, three -dimensional characters whom readers are eager to follow into an alternative ``terra'' so ``incognita'' as to boggle the mind and inspire an almost Lovecraftian horror. Omar, a ``weird'' new kid, and teenage Laura are the travelers into the fourth dimension here, and those adults who may question their motivation have forgotten the overwhelming urgency of the adolescent need for love and acceptance. The alternative world that they find is a spectacularly successful speculative achievement, thanks in part to its remarkable verisimilitude and in part to Sleator's success in creating wonderfully alien creatures who are, nevertheless, emotionally and intellectually comprehensible. The mathematics of their milieu has also been made intellectually comprehensible (no small achievement) by Sleator's skillful introduction of theoretical considerations into his plot and his consistent application of them. In fact his two worldsours and its fourth-dimensional neighbormay be seen as representing two sides of an equation, just as his two sets of charactersLaura and Omar, Gigigi and Ramoomare oddly identical. The sum of all these disparate parts is a novel that is viscerally exciting, mentally stimulating, and deeply satisfying. Michael Cart, Beverly Hills Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Once again, Sleator treats us to the best that YA science fiction can offer: averageand sometimes not-so-averageteenagers facing the physical and mathematical absurdities of our universe. Laura's determination to get into medical school has cast her as a brain and, thus, untouchable. She has a crush on Pete, the football captainand weird things are happening on a daily basis, ever since Omar, the creepy boy next door, moved in. Laura makes Omar confess his secrets: he's training to become the guardian of the Second Dimension, while he's exploring the Fifth. Laura invites Pete on a journey to the Fifth Dimensionbut her game becomes a nightmare when she and Pete are captured, and the whole existence of the world depends on Omar's ability to rescue them. After the seriousness of Singularity, Sleator has returned to some of the humor of Interstellar Pig. A welcome offering from a versatile writer. (10-16) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Teenage Laura wheedles her weirdo neighbor, Omar, into taking her into the fourth dimension, a seemingly nightmare world in which she views everything inside and out, in cross section and in parts. (O 15 86)