Cover image for Buried lives : the enslaved people of George Washington's Mount Vernon
Title:
Buried lives : the enslaved people of George Washington's Mount Vernon
ISBN:
9780823436972
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, [2018]
Physical Description:
x, 158 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm
Contents:
William Lee -- Christopher Sheels -- Carolina (Branham) & Peter Hardiman -- Ona Maria Judge -- Hercules -- End of an era -- And then what happened? -- Buried lives -- Washington's own words about slavery.
Summary:
"When he was eleven years old, George Washington inherited ten human beings. The life of the first president has been well chronicled, but the lives of the people of color he owned--the people who sustained his plantation and were buried in unmarked graves there--have not. Using fascinating primary source material and photographs of historical artifacts, author Carla Killough McClafferty sheds light on the lives of several of the men and women enslaved by the Washington family: talented people like Caroline, an expert seamstress, and Peter Hardiman, a gifted horseman, who married and raised a family on the plantation. Determined people like Ona Maria Judge, who tended to Martha Washington's needs day and night, but who still managed, one fateful day, to slip away and sail to freedom. McClafferty also explains in clear terms the property laws of the day that complicated George Washington's eventual decision to free the people he owned, and the modern-day archaeological survey at Mount Vernon's Slave Cemetery that is uncovering new information about a burial ground that was nearly forgotten to time."--Page [2] of cover.
Genre:
Interest age level:
Age 8-12.
Interest grade level:
Grade 4 to 6.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
Status
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Children's Book 920.009 Mccla
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Children's Book 920.009 Mccla
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Children's Book 920.009 Mccla
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On Order

Summary

Summary

An illuminating look at the complex relationships between George Washington and the enslaved people of Mount Vernon, and the history still being uncovered there.

When he was eleven years old, George Washington inherited ten human beings. His own life has been well chronicled, but the lives of the people he owned--the people who supported his plantation and were buried in unmarked graves there--have not. Using fascinating primary source material and photographs of historical artifacts, Carla McClafferty sheds light on the lives of several people George Washington owned; the property laws of the day that complicated his decision to free them; and the Cemetery Survey, an archeological dig (set to conclude in 2018) that is shaping our understanding of Mount Vernon's Slave Cemetery. Poignant and thought-provoking, Buried Lives blends the past with the present in a forward-looking account of a haunting piece of American history.

Includes a foreword by Zsun-nee Matema, a descendant one of the enslaved people at Mount Vernon who is highlighted in this book, backmatter outlining the author's sources, and an index.

A Junior Library Guild selection!


Author Notes

CARLA KILLOUGH MCCLAFFERTY is the author of many nonfiction books for young readers, including The Many Faces of George Washington: Remaking a Presidential Icon , which was a School Library Journa l Best Book of 2011, a Junior Library Guild selection, and an ALA Notable Book.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* At the age of eleven George Washington inherited ten human beings, and he would own people his entire life. In this handsome, large-format book, the first five chapters describe what is known about six enslaved individuals who worked at Mount Vernon under George Washington, whose lives are fairly well documented. William Lee served as Washington's personal valet before, during, and after the Revolutionary War. Christopher Sheels became Washington's next valet. Caroline Hardiman was a seamstress. Her husband, Peter Hardiman, managed horse breeding at Mount Vernon. Both Oney Judge, Martha Washington's personal maid, and Hercules, the family's renowned cook, later made their separate escapes from slavery. Some of McClafferty's portrayals of these little-known historical people are more detailed than others, but all are factual and fascinating. While learning about their lives, readers will also see how Washington's views on slavery shifted over the years. Among the many beautiful color illustrations are period paintings as well as photos of sites and artifacts. The final chapter describes ongoing archaeological work at the cemetery where Mount Vernon's enslaved people were buried. The meticulous back matter links quotes to many primary sources as well as more recent works. An enlightening presentation on slavery in the late 1700s.--Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2018 Booklist