Cover image for Learning to see : a novel of Dorothea Lange, the woman who revealed the real America
Title:
Learning to see : a novel of Dorothea Lange, the woman who revealed the real America
ISBN:
9780062686534
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2019]

©2019
Physical Description:
362 pages, 14 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
General Note:
"P.S. insights, interviews & more ..."--Cover.
Summary:
Learning to See is a gripping account of the Dorothea Lange, the woman behind the camera who risked everything for art, activism, and love.

"In 1918, a fearless twenty-two-year old arrives in bohemian San Francisco from the Northeast, determined to make her own way as an independent woman. Renaming herself Dorothea Lange she is soon the celebrated owner of the city's most prestigious and stylish portrait studio and wife of the talented but volatile painter, Maynard Dixon. By the early 1930s, as America's economy collapses, her marriage founders and Dorothea must find ways to support her two young sons single-handedly. Determined to expose the horrific conditions of the nation's poor, she takes to the road with her camera, creating images that inspire, reform, and define the era. And when the United States enters World War II, Dorothea chooses to confront another injustice--the incarceration of thousands of innocent Japanese Americans. At a time when women were supposed to keep the home fires burning, Dorothea Lange, creator of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century, dares to be different. But her choices came at a steep price..."--Back cover.
Personal Subject:
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Summary

Summary

If you liked Sold on a Monday and Beautiful Exiles, you'll love this novel about strong-willed trailblazing photographer, Dorothea Lange, whose fame grew during World War II and the Great Depression.

"Hooper excels at humanizing giants....seamlessly weaving together the time, places and people in Lange's life...For photo buffs and others familiar with her vast body of work, reading the book will be like discovering the secret backstory of someone they thought they knew." --The Washington Post

In 1918, a fearless twenty-two-year old arrives in bohemian San Francisco from the Northeast, determined to make her own way as an independent woman. Renaming herself Dorothea Lange she is soon the celebrated owner of the city's most prestigious and stylish portrait studio and wife of the talented but volatile painter, Maynard Dixon.

By the early 1930s, as America's economy collapses, her marriage founders and Dorothea must find ways to support her two young sons single-handedly. Determined to expose the horrific conditions of the nation's poor, she takes to the road with her camera, creating images that inspire, reform, and define the era. And when the United States enters World War II, Dorothea chooses to confront another injustice--the incarceration of thousands of innocent Japanese Americans.

At a time when women were supposed to keep the home fires burning, Dorothea Lange, creator of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century, dares to be different. But her choices came at a steep price...


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

In an earnest sophomore effort that closely hews to biographical facts, Hooper (The Other Alcott) presents a fictionalized account of photographer Lange, who snapped the famous Migrant Mother picture in 1936. Hooper's Lange is scrappy, fighting for success first as a portrait photographer in San Francisco in the late 1910s and into the 1920s, then as a documentarian of American life during the Great Depression and WWII. Lange's tenacity stems from a troubled childhood-a bout with polio that left her with a twisted foot, an absent father, and an overworked mother. She's determined to do better than her parents by attaining a rewarding career and a happy family life. But Lange's first marriage, to painter Maynard Dixon, unravels with his infidelities. When their incomes take a hit from the Depression, Lange decides they should separate and place their two sons in foster care. She finds a better second marriage to Paul Taylor, an economist, but spends years trying to repair her relationships with her sons. Historical fiction fans will gobble up Hooper's novel and be left with the satisfied feeling that they have lived through much of the 20th century with Dorothea Lange. Agent: Barbara Braun Assoc. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.