Cover image for Tell your children : the truth about marijuana, mental illness, and violence
Title:
Tell your children : the truth about marijuana, mental illness, and violence
ISBN:
9781982103668
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Free Press, 2019.
Physical Description:
232 pages
Contents:
Introduction: Everything you're about to read is true -- Part one: Then and now. Madness on two continents ; Schizophrenia, (mis)understood ; Getting high in the 1970s ; The first real proof ; Medical marijuana wins -- Part two: Proof. A round-the-world search for evidence ; An unlikely theory gains traction ; Study after study after study ; Stories from the front lines ; An epidemic arrives -- Part three: The red tide. Laboratory studies, real-world facts ; Axes and knives ; One bad trip ; Myths, spreading -- Epilogue: What now?
Summary:
"An eye-opening report from an award-winning author and former New York Times reporter reveals the link between teenage marijuana use and mental illness, and a hidden epidemic of violence caused by the drug--facts the media have ignored as the United States rushes to legalize cannabis. Recreational marijuana is now legal in nine states. Almost all Americans believe the drug should be legal for medical use. Advocates argue cannabis can help everyone from veterans to cancer sufferers. But legalization has been built on myths- that marijuana arrests fill prisons; that most doctors want to use cannabis as medicine; that it can somehow stem the opiate epidemic; that it is not just harmless but beneficial for mental health. In this meticulously reported book, Alex Berenson, a former New York Times reporter, explodes those myths: Almost no one is in prison for marijuana; A tiny fraction of doctors write most authorizations for medical marijuana, mostly for people who have already used; Marijuana use is linked to opiate and cocaine use. Since 2008, the US and Canada have seen soaring marijuana use and an opiate epidemic. Britain has falling marijuana use and no epidemic; Most of all, THC--the chemical in marijuana responsible for the drug's high--can cause psychotic episodes. After decades of studies, scientists no longer seriously debate if marijuana causes psychosis. Psychosis brings violence, and cannabis-linked violence is spreading. In the four states that first legalized, murders have risen 25 percent since legalization, even more than the recent national increase. In Uruguay, which allowed retail sales in July 2017, murders have soared this year. Berenson's reporting ranges from the London institute that is home to the scientists who helped prove the cannabis-psychosis link to the Colorado prison where a man now serves a thirty-year sentence after eating a THC-laced candy bar and killing his wife. He sticks to the facts, and they are devastating. With the US already gripped by one drug epidemic, this book will make readers reconsider if marijuana use is worth the risk"-- Provided by publisher.

"An eye-opening report from an award-winning author and former New York Times reporter reveals the link between teenage marijuana use and mental illness, and a hidden epidemic of violence caused by the drug--facts the media have ignored as the United States rushes to legalize cannabis"-- Provided by publisher.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
Status
Searching...
Book 362.295 Beren
Searching...
Searching...
Book 362.295 Beren
Searching...
Searching...
Book 362.295 Beren
Searching...
Searching...
Book 362.295 Beren
Searching...
Searching...
Book 362.295 BEREN
Searching...
Searching...
Book 362.295 Beren
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

An eye-opening report from an award-winning author and former New York Times reporter reveals the link between teenage marijuana use and mental illness, and a hidden epidemic of violence caused by the drug--facts the media have ignored as the United States rushes to legalize cannabis.

Recreational marijuana is now legal in nine states. Almost all Americans believe the drug should be legal for medical use. Advocates argue cannabis can help everyone from veterans to cancer sufferers. But legalization has been built on myths- that marijuana arrests fill prisons; that most doctors want to use cannabis as medicine; that it can somehow stem the opiate epidemic; that it is not just harmless but beneficial for mental health. In this meticulously reported book, Alex Berenson, a former New York Times reporter, explodes those myths:

* Almost no one is in prison for marijuana;
* A tiny fraction of doctors write most authorizations for medical marijuana, mostly for people who have already used;
* Marijuana use is linked to opiate and cocaine use. Since 2008, the US and Canada have seen soaring marijuana use and an opiate epidemic. Britain has falling marijuana use and no epidemic;
* Most of all, THC--the chemical in marijuana responsible for the drug's high--can cause psychotic episodes. After decades of studies, scientists no longer seriously debate if marijuana causes psychosis.

Psychosis brings violence, and cannabis-linked violence is spreading. In the four states that first legalized, murders have risen 25 percent since legalization, even more than the recent national increase. In Uruguay, which allowed retail sales in July 2017, murders have soared this year.

Berenson's reporting ranges from the London institute that is home to the scientists who helped prove the cannabis-psychosis link to the Colorado prison where a man now serves a thirty-year sentence after eating a THC-laced candy bar and killing his wife. He sticks to the facts, and they are devastating.

With the US already gripped by one drug epidemic, this book will make readers reconsider if marijuana use is worth the risk.


Author Notes

Alex Berenson was born on January 6, 1973. He graduated from Yale University in 1994 with degrees in history and economics. After college, he became a reporter for the Denver Post. In 1996, he became one of the first employees at TheStreet.com, the financial news website. In 1999, he became a reporter for The New York Times. While there he covered topics ranging from the occupation of Iraq to the flooding of New Orleans to the financial crimes of Bernie Madoff. He left the Times in 2010 to concentrate on writing fiction, but he occasionally contributes to the newspaper.

His first book, The Faithful Spy, won the 2007 Edgar Award for Best First Novel. His other works include The John Wells series and the nonfiction books The Number and The Prisoner.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

A novelist and former New York Times reporter, Berenson (The Deceivers) brings strong persuasive skills, acknowledgment his cause may be lost, and frustrated desperation to this antimarijuana manifesto. Berenson compiles the strongest research he can find, including repurposed analysis of studies focused on related topics, international studies, sensational true-crime narratives, government data, and discussions with primary researchers, to make the case that marijuana is dangerous to the brain and associated with increased risks of developing schizophrenia or experiencing psychotic episodes. He argues that presentations of marijuana as a powerful medicine is misleading-only the CBD component has been FDA approved as a seizure treatment and the evidence for effective use beyond mild pain relief is weak-and sees the emphasis on medical use as paving the way for a business-centered legalization model in which high-THC products are king. Berenson also pushes back on the idea of legalization as a panacea for the opiate crisis or drug-linked crime, but primarily he aims to refute a widespread image of marijuana as an enjoyable, mellow, and harmless mild intoxicant. Those who favor legalization are likely to remain unmoved, but Berenson is certainly meticulous and coherent about making his case, and his well-written treatise never descends into Reefer Madness-like hysteria. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Table of Contents

Introduction: Everything You're About to Read Is Truep. xi
Part 1 Then And Now
1 Madness on Two Continentsp. 3
2 Schizophrenia, (Mis)Understoodp. 17
3 Getting High in the 1970sp. 33
4 The First Real Proofp. 47
5 Medical Marijuana Winsp. 57
Part 2 Proof
6 A Round-the-World Search for Evidencep. 81
7 An Unlikely Theory Gains Tractionp. 101
8 Study After Study After Studyp. 120
9 Stories from the Front Linesp. 128
10 An Epidemic Arrivesp. 140
Part 3 The Red Tide
11 Laboratory Studies, Real-World Factsp. 165
12 Axes and Knivesp. 179
13 One Bad Tripp. 192
14 Myths, Spreadingp. 209
Epilogue: What Now?p. 219
Acknowledgmentsp. 229