Cover image for As long as we both shall live
Title:
As long as we both shall live
ISBN:
9781250076397
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Flatiron Books, 2019.
Physical Description:
324 pages ; 24 cm
Summary:
"My wife! I think she's dead!" Matt frantically tells park rangers that he and his wife, Marie, were hiking when she fell off a cliff into the raging river below. They start a search, but they aren't hopeful: no one could have survived that fall. It was a tragic accident. But Matt's first wife also died in suspicious circumstances. And when the police pull a body out of the river, they have a lot more questions for Matt. Detectives Loren and Spengler want to know if Matt is a grieving, twice-unlucky husband or a cold-blooded murderer. They dig into the couple's lives to see what they can unearth. And they find that love's got teeth, it's got claws, and once it hitches you to a person, it's tough to rip yourself free. So what happens when you're done making it work?" -- Provided by publisher.
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Summary

Summary

"Unputdownable....This novel is anything but predictable. The female characters are forces of nature, and the plot twists are deliciously demented, a la Gone Girl and Big Little Lies ." -- People

You can't be married to someone without sometimes wanting to kill them...

As Long As We Both Shall Live is JoAnn Chaney's wicked, masterful examination of a marriage gone very wrong, a marriage with lots of secrets...

"My wife! I think she's dead!" Matt frantically tells park rangers that he and his wife, Marie, were hiking when she fell off a cliff into the raging river below. They start a search, but they aren't hopeful: no one could have survived that fall. It was a tragic accident.

But Matt's first wife also died in suspicious circumstances. And when the police pull a body out of the river, they have a lot more questions for Matt.

Detectives Loren and Spengler want to know if Matt is a grieving, twice-unlucky husband or a cold-blooded murderer. They dig into the couple's lives to see what they can unearth. And they find that love's got teeth, it's got claws, and once it hitches you to a person, it's tough to rip yourself free.

So what happens when you're done making it work?


Author Notes

JoAnn Chaney is a graduate of UC Riverside's Palm Desert MFA program. She lives in Colorado with her family. She is the author of What You Don't Know , which was longlisted for the Crime Writers' Association's John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger Award and was one of BookRiot's Best Mysteries of the Year, and As Long As We Both Shall Live.


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

The fall of 40-something housewife Marie Evans off a cliff above the Three Forks River in Estes Park, Colo., kick-starts this uneven domestic thriller from Chaney (What You Don't Know). According to Marie's husband, Matt, the couple were hiking when she slipped off a cliff, but nearby campers report having heard a woman scream for mercy shortly before Marie went missing. Matt maintains his innocence, but Denver homicide detectives Marion Spengler and Ralph Loren have their doubts-particularly once they learn that 23 years earlier Madison, Wis., police suspected Matt of murdering his first wife. As recovery teams search for Marie's body, Spengler and Loren investigate the Evanses' marriage. But after a strong start, the plot loses momentum. Though the complex female characters intrigue, crass male stereotypes monopolize the narrative, robbing the tale of depth and verisimilitude. Twists abound, but poorly established stakes lessen their impact, and a subplot spotlighting Loren's dark past distracts from the central mystery. Hopefully, Chaney will do better next time. Agent: Stephanie Cabot, Gernet Co. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Chaney grabs readers with her opening line: If you try to kill your wife without a plan, you will fail. It's advice Matt Evans neglects to heed. In 1995, Matt's wife, Justine, catches him with another woman at their home in Madison, Wisconsin, and the next morning their house is burned down, with Justine's charred remains among the ruins. Twenty-three years later, Matt and his current wife, Marie, are on a hike in Rocky Mountain National Park, not far from their home in Denver, when Marie goes off a cliff to near-certain death in the river below. Investigation of the 2018 incident turns up information about what happened in 1995, when dogged detective Abraham Reid called Evans' account of events a lie. As Denver Homicide Detective Marion Spengler and her boss, Ralph Loren, search for Marie, dead or alive, and question whether she fell or was pushed, they're joined by Reid, now retired in Phoenix, and together they ferret out the truth. Chaney (What You Don't Know, 2017) expertly toggles the narrative between 1995 and 2018 to gradually reveal the truth. Marriage laid bare, with a riveting account of evasion and pursuit and a zinger of a coda.--Michele Leber Copyright 2018 Booklist


New York Review of Books Review

AS LONG AS WE BOTH SHALL LIVE, by JoAnn Chaney. (Flatiron, $27.99.) In this thriller with echoes of "Gone Girl," a hiker whose first wife died in a mysterious fire rushes down from a mountainside claiming that his second wife has fallen from a precipice into the river below. THE PLOTTERS, by Un-Su Kim. Translated by Sora Kim-Russell. (Doubleday, $25.95.) In a slightly akilter version of Seoul, a handsome young assassin is in danger. ZUCKED: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe, by Roger McNamee. (Penguin Press, $28.) The story of Facebook has been told many times before, but McNamee - an early investor in the company - does a superb job of contextualizing its rise within the proper technological history. And this book is not merely the cri de coeur of a forsworn tech optimist zinged by moral conscience. It's also a robust and helpful itemization of the ways Facebook could be brought to heel. ANTISEMITISM: Here and Now, by Deborah E. Lipstadt. (Schocken, $25.95.) Lipstadt seeks to awaken her audience to the nature, persistence and scale of an age-old prejudice that never seems to die, along with the insidious new ways in which it seeks to disguise itself. BREAKING NEWS: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now, by Alan Rusbridger. (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $30.) The former editor of the British daily The Guardian recalls coping with the dramatic transformation of the newspaper business and his concerns about the present assault on truth and fact. MERCHANTS OF TRUTH: The Business of News and the Fight for Facts, by Jill Abramson. (Simon & Schuster, $30.) Abramson examines four news organizations, including The New York Times, which she led at one time as executive editor, and combines analysis with gossip to underline her commitment to journalism at a moment when its future has never looked more uncertain. THE DAKOTA WINTERS, by Tom Barbash. (Ecco/HarperCollins, $26.99.) This novel is set at the famous Dakota building in 1979 and 1980, as the young narrator tries to define himself in the shadow of a charismatic father. He has help from one of the building's most famous residents, John Lennon. WHERE REASONS END, by Yiyun Li. (Random House, $25.) Composed after the suicide of Li's teenage son, this devastating novel comprises a dialogue between a mother and her dead child: a stringent meditation on love, loss and the limitations of language. CICADA, written and illustrated by Shaun Tan. (Arthur A. Levine/ Scholastic, $19.99; ages 12 and up.) A gray-suited cicada works in an office, underpaid and insulted, until he transforms and flies away in this enigmatic, profound picture book for older readers. The full reviews of these and other recent books are on the web: nytimes.com/books