Cover image for Charlie Company's journey home : the boys of '67 and the war they left behind
Title:
Charlie Company's journey home : the boys of '67 and the war they left behind
ISBN:
9781472827494

9781472827463
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Oxford, UK : Osprey Publishing, 2018.

©2018
Physical Description:
400 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
General Note:
"The forgotten impact on the wives of Vietnam veterans"--Cover.
Contents:
The women of Charlie Company -- Marriage and training -- Wartime -- Days of terror -- Loss -- War's end and homecoming -- Living with Vietnam.
Summary:
The human experience of the Vietnam War is almost impossible to grasp - the camaraderie, the fear, the smell, the pain. Men were transformed into soldiers, and then into warriors. These warriors had wives who loved them and shared in their transformations. Some marriages were strengthened, while for others there was all too often a dark side, leaving men and their families emotionally and spiritually battered for years to come. Focusing in on just one company's experience of war and its eventual homecoming, Andrew Wiest shines a light on the shared experience of combat and both the darkness and resiliency of war's aftermath"-- Publisher's description.

"The men of Charlie Company were a small, tight-knit group, representative of the melting pot of America that served in Vietnam. The women of Charlie Company had sent happy, idealistic young men to war. Some returned tempered by the experience of combat, while the wives of others welcomed home men whom they no longer recognized--but everyone, both husbands and wives, had irrevocably changed. Some families strove to set Vietnam aside, while others wrestled with the darkness of war's aftermath as wives stood by their husbands through homelessness, alcoholism, and physical abuse. Some couldn't stand the pain and left the loves of their lives forever. Some reclaimed their loved ones from the brink of oblivion. Some had only memories to cherish. Using stories gathered from the women themselves, Andrew Wiest reveals who these wives and girlfriends were, and how the crucible of war indelibly changed them. Hopes and dreams were often shattered but many of these women found an inner steel, a determination not only to survive but to thrive against the odds in an America that too often forgot its veterans and their families. War was the anvil on which these young lives were beaten and forged anew, for good or bad. But While history has ultimately redeemed their husbands, the contributions and difficulties of the wives have remained unnoticed, leaving them alone in a crowded world. This is their story"--Dust jacket.
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Book 959.704 Wiest
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Book 959.704 Wiest
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Summary

Summary

The Boys of '67 and the War They Left Behind

The human experience of the Vietnam War is almost impossible to grasp--the camaraderie, the fear, the smell, the pain. Men were transformed into soldiers, and then into warriors.

These warriors had wives who loved them and shared in their transformations. Some marriages were strengthened, while for others there was all too often a dark side, leaving men and their families emotionally and spiritually battered for years to come.

Focusing in on just one company's experience of war and its eventual homecoming, Andrew Wiest shines a light on the shared experience of combat and both the darkness and resiliency of war's aftermath.


Author Notes

Dr Andrew Wiest is Professor of History at the University of Southern Mississippi and is also the founding director of the Center for the Study of War and Society. Specializing in the study of World War I and Vietnam, he has served as a Visiting Senior Lecturer at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and as a Visiting Professor in the Department of Warfighting Strategy in the United States Air Force Air War College. Since 1992 Dr Wiest has been active in international education, developing the award-winning Vietnam Study Abroad Program.

Wiest's titles include Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN (New York University), which won the Society for Military History's Distinguished Book Award; America and the Vietnam War (Routledge); Rolling Thunder in a Gentle Land (Osprey); Passchendaele and the Royal Navy (Greenwood Press); and The Boys of '67 (Osprey). Additionally Dr Wiest has appeared in and consulted on several historical documentaries for the History Channel, Granada Television, PBS, the BBC and for Lucasfilm. Wiest lives in Hattiesburg, Mississippi with his wife Jill and their three children Abigail, Luke and Wyatt.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Wiest, a history professor at University of Southern Mississippi, offers something rare in the literary canon of the Vietnam War: an in-depth look at the families-primarily the wives-of the company of U.S. Army 9th Infantry division men he chronicled in The Boys of '67 (2012). For that book, Wiest spent three years interviewing nearly 100 officers and enlistees of Charlie Company and their significant others. He conducted additional interviews with the soldiers' wives for the new book and made use of eight "major letter collections." Through oral histories and his own scene-setting, Wiest tells of the experiences of college students, young housewives and mothers, and working women before, during, and after their husbands' service in Vietnam. Among the women are Kaye French, who recalls changing her wedding date to accommodate her husband's training and finding out she was pregnant just after he shipped out; Mary Ann Simon, who endured an agonizing wait for updates after her future husband was shot in Vietnam; and Sue Reed, whose marriage foundered partly due to her husband's wartime experiences. Wiest writes well and with empathy for what the women went through. This is a novel look at the Vietnam War's legacy that speaks to the experiences of military families today. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

In 1967, the United States increased its -presence in Vietnam from 300,000 to 500,000 troops, 40 percent of whom were married. Wiest (history, Univ. of Southern Mississippi) follows up his powerful work The Boys of '67 with a sequel of sorts: the perspectives of the wives and families left behind. Using oral interviews, letters, diaries, and other primary resources, Wiest provides a compassionate look at how the conflict impacted these individuals to the present day. Although specific to this Vietnam experience, readers will appreciate the common threads that run through the sacrifices of military duty during conflict: loneliness, striving for balance upon return to civilian life, and coping with physical and mental illnesses related to wartime service. Although there are plenty of other works that discuss the home front, the uniqueness here lies in the cohesive yet distinctive experiences of the Charlie Company itself, offering a deeper understanding of the soldiers through the actions of their wives during their year away. VERDICT Historians, military spouses, and those impacted by Vietnam will find this work sensitive, familiar, and uplifting.-Maria Bagshaw, Elgin Community Coll. Lib., IL © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.