Cover image for A new way of seeing : the history of art in 57 works
Title:
A new way of seeing : the history of art in 57 works
ISBN:
9780500239636
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London ; New York, New York : Thames & Hudson, [2019]

©2019
Physical Description:
256 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 28 cm
General Note:
"Over 200 illustrations"--Title page.
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: 01. Ashurbanipal Hunting Lions (c. 645-635 BC) -- 02. Parthenon Sculptures (c. 444 BC) -- 03. Terracotta Army of the First Qin Emperor (c. 210 BC) -- 04. Villa of the Mysteries murals (c. 60-50 BC) -- 05. Laocoon and his Sons (c. 27 BC-AD 68) -- 06. Trajan's Column Apollodorus of Damascus (AD 113) -- 07. Book of Kells (c. AD 800) -- 08. Travellers among Mountains and Streams Fan K'uan (c. 1000) -- 09. Bayeux Tapestry (c. 1077 or after) -- 10. Universal Man Hildegard of Bingen (1165) -- 11. Expulsion from the Garden of Eden Masaccio (c. 1427) -- 12. Ghent Altarpiece Jan van Eyck (1430-32) -- 13. Descent from the Cross Rogier van der Weyden (c. 1435) -- 14. Annunciation Fra Angelico (c. 1438-47) -- 15. Lamentation over the Dead Christ Andrea Mantegna (c. 1480) -- 16. Birth of Venus Sandro Botticelli (c. 1482-85) -- 17. Mona Lisa Leonardo da Vinci (c. 1503-6) -- 18. Garden of Earthly Delights Hieronymus Bosch (1505-10) -- 19. Sistine Chapel ceiling frescoes Michelangelo (1508-12) -- 20. School of Athens Raphael (1510-11) -- 21. Isenheim Altarpiece Matthias Grunewald (1512-16) -- 22. Bacchus and Ariadne Titian (1520-23) -- 23. Self-Portrait Catharina van Hemessen (1548) -- 24. Crucifixion Tintoretto (1565-87) -- 25. Supper at Emmaus Caravaggio (1601) -- 26. Ecstasy of St Teresa Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1647-52) -- 27. Las Meninas Diego Velazquez (1656) -- 28. Girl with a Pearl Earring Johannes Vermeer (c. 1665) -- 29. Self-Portrait with Two Circles Rembrandt van Rijn (c. 1665-69) -- 30. Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump Joseph Wright of Derby (1768) -- 31. Nightmare Henry Fuseli (1781) -- 32. Third of May 1808 Francisco Goya (1814) -- 33. Hay Wain John Constable (1821) -- 34. Rain, Steam, and Speed -- The Great Western Railway J. M. W. Turner (1844) -- 35. Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother) James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1871) -- 36. Thinker Auguste Rodin (1880-1904) -- 37. Bar at the Folies-Bergere Edouard Manet (1882) -- 38. Bathers at Asnieres Georges Seurat (1884) -- 39. Scream Edvard Munch (1893) -- 40. Large Bathers Paul Cezanne (1900-6) -- 41. Group IV, No. 7, Adulthood Hilma af Klint (1907) -- 42. Kiss Gustav Klimt (1907) -- 43. Dance Henri Matisse (1909-10) -- 44. Water Lilies Claude Monet (1914-26) -- 45. Fountain Marcel Duchamp (1917) -- 46. American Gothic Grant Wood (1930) -- 47. Persistence of Memory Salvador Dali (1931) -- 48. Guernica Pablo Picasso (1937) -- 49. L'Egypte de Mlle Cleo de Merode: cours elementaire d'histoire naturelle Joseph Cornell (1940) -- 50. Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird Frida Kahlo (1940) -- 51. One: Number 31 Jackson Pollock (1950) -- 52. Study after Velazquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X Francis Bacon (1953) -- 53. Brillo Boxes Andy Warhol (1964) -- 54. Backs and Fronts Sean Scully 1981 -- 55. Betty Gerhard Richter (1988) -- 56. Maman Louise Bourgeois (1999) -- 57. Artist is Present Marina Abramovic (2010).
Summary:
From a carved mammoth tusk (c. 40,000 bce) to Duchamp's Fountain (1917), and Bosch's Garden of Earthly Delights (1505-10) to Louise Bourgeois's Maman (1999), a remarkable lexicon of astonishing imagery has imprinted itself onto cultural consciousness over the past 40,000 years -- a resilient visual vocabulary whose meaning has proved elastic and endlessly renewable from era to era. It is to these works that Kelly Grovier devotes himself in this radical new art history. Stepping away from biography, style and the chronology of 'isms' that preoccupies most art history to focus on the artworks themselves, Grovier tells a new story in which we learn from the artworks, not just about them. Looking closely at each work, he identifies an 'eye-hook' - the part of the artwork that 'bridges the divide between art and life, giving it palpable purpose and elevating its value beyond the visual to the vital' -- and encourages us to squint through this narrow aperture to perceive the work's truest meanings. This book is unique in emphasizing the durability of what is made over the ephemerality of its making and serves as a rejoinder to a growing sensibility that conceives of artists as brands and the works they create as nothing more than material commodities to hoard, hide, and flip for profit. Lavishly illustrated with many of the most breathtaking and enduring artworks ever created, as well as many that inspired or took inspiration from them, this refreshing book will spark a debate about how it is that artworks articulate who we are and what it means to be alive in the world.
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Book 709 Grovi
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Book 709 Grovi
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Book 709 Grovi
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Summary

Summary

From a carved mammoth tusk (ca. 40,000 BCE) to Bosch's Garden of Earthly Delights (1505-1510) to Duchamp's Fountain (1917), a remarkable lexicon of astonishing imagery has imprinted itself onto the cultural consciousness of the past 40,000 years.

Author Kelly Grovier devotes himself to illuminating these and more than fifty other seminal works in this radical new history of art. Stepping away from biography, style, and the chronology of "isms" that preoccupies most of art history, A New Way of Seeing invites a new interaction with art, one in which we learn from the artworks and not just about them. Grovier identifies that part of the artwork that bridges the divide between art and life and elevates its value beyond the visual to the vital. This book challenges the sensibility that conceives of artists as brands and the works they create as nothing more than material commodities to hoard, hide, and flip for profit.

Lavishly illustrated with many of the most breathtaking and enduring artworks ever created, Kelly Grovier casts fresh light on these famous works by daring to isolate a single, and often overlooked, detail responsible for its greatness and power to move.


Author Notes

Kelly Grovier is a poet, historian, and cultural critic. He is a regular contributor on art to the
Times Literary Supplement, and his writing has appeared in numerous publications, including
the Observer, Sunday Times, and Wired. Educated at the University of California, Los Angeles,
and at the University of Oxford, he is the author of 100 Works of Art That Will Define Our Age
and Art Since 1989.