Cover image for Just right : searching for the Goldilocks planet
Title:
Just right : searching for the Goldilocks planet
ISBN:
9781250155337
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Roaring Brook Press, 2019.

©2019
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Follow a young girl as she explores questions about the wondrous search for another Goldilocks planet.
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

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Children's Book 523.2 Manle
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Children's Book 523.2 Manle
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Children's Book 523.2 Manle
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Children's Book 523.2 Manle
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Children's Book 523.2 Manle
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Summary

Summary

Do you wonder if humansare the only beings who wonderif they are alone in the universe?Our sun is a star.In the night sky are all kinds of stars,and orbiting those starsare planets like the ones in our own solar system. Planet Earth is not too big,not too small, not too hot,and not too cold. It's just right.Our very own Goldilocks planet . . . . Follow a young girlas she explores these questionsin this gorgeous book about the wondrous searchfor another Goldilocks planet.


Author Notes

Curtis Manley grew up building model rockets and reading science fiction about aliens and long trips to other star systems-none of which had Jupiter-like planets close to their stars. Later he studied volcanoes and the geology of other planets and moons. In the high desert of Idaho he mapped huge lava flows similar to ones on Venus. Jessica Lanan has long been enchanted by the mysteries of the cosmos. Exoplanets are too far away for her to visit, but illustrating them is the next best thing.


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-Beginning with the insights of astronomers such as Lucretius and Giordano Bruno and continuing with the observations of a fictional young black girl from the present day, this illuminating book examines the possibility of life on other planets. Manley presents scientific certainties and theories alongside the child and her family's trip to a museum. One spread features text about Earth-like exoplanets paired with illustrations of the girl gazing off open-mouthed at the promising habitable planet surface that exists, for her, beyond the walls of the museum. On some pages, she muses, "If someday we do find evidence of beings like ourselves, what could we do? .We could send them art and poetry and music." The enthusiastic main character lightens what could be weighty scientific information, providing an entry point for newcomers. Lanan's pleasing, watercolorlike artwork moves between expansive visions of outer space and panels that highlight key concepts. VERDICT An ideal addition for libraries building or updating STEAM collections.-Elaine Fultz, Madison Jr. Sr. High School, Middletown, OH © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Readers join a brown-skinned girl with a polka-dotted backpack as she asks questions about the stars and visits a space museum, where she watches exoplanets careen overhead in a planetarium. In sweeping, inky art, Lanan captures the child's dawning awareness of the vastness of the universe. Manley's writing swings gracefully between factual descriptions ("Earth orbits in our solar system's 'habitable zone''") and more lyrical observations: "All stars twinkle, but some stars also seem to wink at us... as if saying, 'I know a secret.''" Back home after the museum trip, the child considers the types of life-forms that might be out there. Richly informative prose and intimate yet expansive art show a child's contagious enthusiasm for the book's subject. Includes a timeline of astronomical discoveries and suggestions for further reading. Ages 5-9. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

The ever-fascinating idea that there may be life on other planets drives this smart discussion of the major advances in astronomy that have led to the discovery of exoplanets (officially, extrasolar planets), along with the conditions that might be necessary to support life (the just right of the title). Manley sets up the science carefully and thoroughly, leading readers step by step through the ways in which astronomers have used tools such as telescopes to see the planets that orbit distant stars. Excellent analogies help readers grasp the techniques: For a few stars that are close to Earth, large telescopes can actually see an exoplanet, but only if the glare from the star is blockedlike when you hide the Moons glow with your hand. Lanans illustrations take the concepts to the next level; the choices of scale, color, and detail in her planetary landscapes make visible the texts content. The clever use of a parallel narrative in the art, which features a young (brown-skinned) girl and her family as they visit a planetarium and bring home a telescope, situates the images of possible other worlds in that characters imagination. On one dramatic double-page spread, where a single sentence in white stands out on a black background, readers are invited to test the limits of their own thinking about exoplanetary life: Maybe its like nothing we can even imagine. Back matter includes more on the science of detecting exoplanets, a brief bibliography, lists of relevant websites, and a timeline of discovering our place in the universe. danielle j. ford January/February 2019 p 115(c) Copyright 2018. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This is an oversize nonfiction picture book about the search for life on exoplanets ­planets beyond our solar system. The text continually poses open-ended questions ( When you look toward the stars, do you ever wonder if anyone is looking back? ) and presents kid-friendly scenarios that help young readers grasp concepts. The text is woven around an African American girl and her family's visit to a space museum, and incorporates information about astronomy, giant telescopes, types of exoplanets, how to find them, and ongoing space research. Of course, if we do someday find a planet that's just right (meaning, it has all the ingredients necessary to sustain human life), that just opens up another batch of questions: Should we stay quiet and hide from them? If we do send a message, what should we say? The illustrations, which employ deep, night-sky backgrounds, complement the text, whether reinforcing content or advancing the action. This is the best kind of science writing a book that offers as many questions as answers. Aspiring astronomers will love it.--Kathleen McBroom Copyright 2019 Booklist